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  1. #1
    i/e regjistruar
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    22-04-2006
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    Shqiptaret ne Connecticut

    what's up ?
    Kam pak kohe qe jetoj ne CT dhe nuk e kam idene a ka shqiptare .
    Anyway,do me behej qefi te njihja ndonje shqiptar qe jeton ketu .

  2. #2
    Perjashtuar Maska e MICHI
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    14-09-2004
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    ka plot mre un kam nja 5 shoke e dy shoqe atje. ca me stamford ca ne hartford.

  3. #3
    i/e regjistruar
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    27-12-2006
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    New York, New York, USA
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    Hi FreeZe,

    Connecticut's Albanian community finds itself sandwiched between the large Albanian communities in the Boston/Worcester area and the NY/NJ area. Nevertheless, you will find sizeable Albanian colonies spread throughout the state.

    The Albanians of Connecticut hail from Albania, Kosova, Macedonia and Montenegro, as well as from Greece. They're a diverse lot.

    The largest concentration of Muslim Albanians is found in Waterbury. They hail largely from the northern Albanian/Montenegrin/Kosovar/Macedonian areas. There are two Albanian Islamic community centers/mosques in Waterbury that I know of. The Waterbury Albanians are friendly and sociable people, and very well-known in the city as some of its best business and social leaders. There is also a population of Albanian Muslims in Hartford, and they attend a local Islamic Center. Unfortunately I don't know what it's called. It could even be the Islamic Center of Hartford.

    Orthodox Christian Albanians are spread rather thinly in Connecticut - there is one Albanian Orthodox Parish, in Trumbull, Connecticut (Bridgeport area). It is St. George's Albanian Orthodox Church. Also, interestingly, there is a 100-year old community of Vlahs from southern Albania who belong to the Roumanian Orthodox Church in Bridgeport. Many of them still speak Albanian fluently. Though Orthodox Albanians living in the Hartford area attend Saint George Greek Orthodox Church, these Albanians were historically very active in Liria and Vatra and some of them have their roots in the long-gone Albanian Orthodox community of Constantinople (Istanbul).

    I do not know of any Albanian Catholic parishes in Connecticut, but where there are so many Catholic parishes in general and where Albanian Catholics are not as numerous as they are in the NY/NJ area, I would imagine that a visit to a Catholic church in a larger Connecticut city might be one way to find out.

    There's always the tried and true way of asking around whenever you meet an Albanian! :-) Hope that helps get you started.

  4. #4
    i/e regjistruar Maska e D&G Feminine
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    08-08-2003
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    Kesaj i them pergjigje une

    How would you describe the community in NY area Peace Matters?

    Mirserdhe ne forum!

  5. #5
    i/e regjistruar
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    27-12-2006
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    Hi D&G,

    Faleminderit shumė!

    Diverse, perplexing, exciting and complex is how I would describe the metro-NYC Albanian community.

    I've learned so much more about the diversity of the Albanian people from living here in New York. As a 2nd generation Albanian-American with roots in Boston's Albanian community (overwhelmingly Korēarė and Orthodox Christian), I really didn't know much about Albanians from other regions (or religious faiths) at all until I moved to Connecticut, and ultimately to New York. I had never known Albanian Catholics, been inside of a Teqe, or heard gegėrisht spoken before I moved to New York.

    The New York metro area has some of the densest concentrations of Albanians outside of the Albanian regions of the Balkans. One of the coolest things for me is that, after having grown up trying to learn Albanian by speaking with my grandparents (and sometimes my parents, if they were up for it), now I can walk down almost any street in Manhattan and see and hear Albanians! I love that!

    Although I was raised Orthodox, I attended Albanian school at the Albanian mosque in Waterbury and learned a thing or two about Islam, which I'm grateful for deeply. I grew up believing that we are all the same, that religion didn't matter, and my experiences at Albanian school in Waterbury reinforced that. I think it prepared me well for my experiences here in New York. I didn't feel like Muslim Albanians were strangers-I felt like they were friends.

    In New York, in a post 9-11 world, I still cling to that "Waterbury Experience", though I have noticed some young people here embracing a more puritanical form of Islam. Young girls taking the veil, young men growing beards, new mistrust of Christian Albanians, whether Catholic or Orthodox. Or Muslim Albanians from Kosova who have never met Orthodox Christian Albanians before stating quite openly to us that being Orthodox means you're being 'Greek', and by default, being a Serb-sympathizer. (I tell you, the most virulent, obnoxious Greek nationalist has no better friend on earth than a Kosovar Albanian (of all people!) stating that Orthodox Albanians are Greeks).

    I read some things on websites posted by New York Albanians that I can scarcely believe. And I have heard stories of people being asked whether they considered themselves Albanian or Muslim - by supposedly fellow Albanian Muslims who believed in exploiting Albanian nationalism here in the US and in the Balkans to create a spring-board for a full-scale Islamic Republic of Albania as a step to returning to the days of the Caliphate. That's right, back to the 'glory days' of the Ottoman Empire. Sigh.

    Again, something we never would have seen or heard in Boston, and something which the overwhelming majority of Albanians here of all faiths find difficult to stomach. I'd be lying to you if I said I didn't find that kind of thing frightening - and not a little tragic.

    Everyone experiences their Albanian-ness in the way they were conditioned to do so. Here in New York, I see Kosovar, Montenegrin, Macedonian and Albanian-Albanians with their own restaurants, churches, mosques, coffee houses, etc. They make noble attempts to show unity at times. They belong to the AANO, they read the same ("only") Albanian newspaper, the join NAAC. They can talk sports together, and they generally avoid talking about religion or politics, for fear of repercussions. Sad, but true.

    I think it's fair to say that the Albanians from Albania itself feel the most marginalized of all in this mix because they experienced 50 years of Stalinist dictatorship. That's something which unites them in one way, and separates them from their fellow Albanians from other regions, and certainly from Albanian-Americans of the original diaspora. The Albanians who emigrated from Albania do not want to stir up Albanian nationalism either in the US or in the Balkans. They have had it. They say mjaft – they want to live life and prosper because they were denied the right to do so. Virtually all of them have family in Italy and Greece and they want to see Albania integrated into the EU/EC. It makes many Albanian-American nationalists with roots outside of Albania angry sometimes – the Albanians of Albania are sometimes accused of abandoning their fellow Albanians.

    I think it’s fair to say that maybe in a way, they have had to abandon their fellow Albanians’ nationalist causes, but not because they don’t care. It’s like when you are riding on an airplane and the stewardess informs you that if the plane hits turbulence and the air masks drop, you must put your own mask on first before you put your child’s mask on. How can Albanians from Albania, who have ZERO, be expected to be able to help anyone if they can’t help themselves first? I’ve been to Albania twice. The entire economy is functioning on remittances from Albanians abroad. That means Albania’s basically broke and operating on welfare, and Albanians in places like New York or Athens or Bari are working too hard just to keep their own ship afloat here in the States AND subsidize their families in Albania. I don’t think that makes Albanians from Albania traitors to Albanians outside Albania. I think that makes them realists.

    The New York Albanians, by and large, are thriving here. They are live and let live people doing the best they can with what they've got. They are working hard, going to the top of their class in school, and acheiving things that make everyone proud. They are appalled by the crime in their communities – and embarrassed by those who call themselves Albanians on Monday, then go out and kill someone on Tuesday because they wanted to show they were ‘tough’. They worry all the time about how they will be perceived by others.

    I think it's fun to go up to Arthur Avenue in the Bronx and eat gjellė. I browse in the Albanian groceries and look at the products, many of which come from other Balkan countries, and Italy. When I visit Astoria, I find Orthodox Albanians from the south, who live and work (as best they can) with the Greeks. There's even a mosque there called the Ali Pasha Mosque - I saw it from the outside. I wondered if maybe they were Albanian Muslims from the south of Albania or northern Greece/Ēameria. When I can, I go out to Jamaica and attend liturgy at the Albanian Orthodox Church, where we have some friends who knew and worked with my godparents in Vatra when they were alive. I had an Albanian tutor who lived in Ridgewood, where there were Albanians, Bosnians, and Roumanians. It was like a little slice of the Balkans, and I once ate a gigantic Bosnian hamburger there. It was as big as a dinner plate, I swear. I never saw anything like it.

    To sum it up, I think that the Albanians of Metro New York are as diverse as their fellow Americans. But that doesn’t stop them from trying to understand and live with one another, even if the road is bumpy sometimes. It’s a place worth exploring, and it’s best done by subway!

    Peace!

  6. #6
    i/e regjistruar
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    My next project: learning about the Arbėreshė and finding more of them. :-)

  7. #7
    i/e regjistruar
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    hej Peace matters thanks for your answer.You gave me a lot of information but i was asking for something more concrete talking to people but that`s ok.
    a dini ndonje party apo mbremje ketej nga Connecticut?

  8. #8
    i/e regjistruar
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    Citim Postuar mė parė nga FreeZe Lexo Postimin
    hej Peace matters thanks for your answer.You gave me a lot of information but i was asking for something more concrete talking to people but that`s ok.
    a dini ndonje party apo mbremje ketej nga Connecticut?
    hey guys I will be in Connecticut actually in Norwalk this September 2011,if there is any Kosovar Albanian society there if known at all ... please tell me.

  9. #9
    New York Maska e mario_kingu
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    09-12-2004
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    New York
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    FreeZe hej Peace matters thanks for your answer.You gave me a lot of information but i was asking for something more concrete talking to people but that`s ok.
    a dini ndonje party apo mbremje ketej nga Connecticut?
    cdo mbremje qe zhvillohet ne Ct mund ti gjesh ne shqiperia.us eshte kommuniteti i shqiptareve ne Us shum web i bukur edhe pse vlen vetem per ne ne Usa
    Ars_1980 Citim:
    Postuar mė parė nga FreeZe
    hey guys I will be in Connecticut actually in Norwalk this September 2011,if there is any Kosovar Albanian society there if known at all ... please tell me.
    ne radh te par urime
    per me shum info per mbremje etc shqiperia.us
    Partizoni

  10. #10
    i/e regjistruar Maska e King_Gentius
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    24-11-2004
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    Boston
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    Ne Worcester MA ka disa DJs qe shpesh here organizojne party shqiptare.

    Eshte nje bar-klub qe frekuentojne, Boiler Room

    Peace, pershkrim shum i mire, pershendetje.
    Ndryshuar pėr herė tė fundit nga King_Gentius : 16-08-2011 mė 22:34

  11. #11
    i/e regjistruar
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    16-03-2014
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    Pėr: Shqiptaret ne Connecticut

    hey qkemi qe edhe une jom shqiptar merre email shkruma emrin e mbiemrin besnik.makolli@gmail.com

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